The NSW Settlement Partnership

The NSW Settlement Partnership (NSP) is a consortium of community organisations, led by Settlement Services International, delivering settlement services in agreed areas of NSW under the Department of Social Services’ Settlement Services Programme (SSP).

The NSP represents a unique and innovative settlement services model and provides an opportunity for organisations with a long and proud history in service delivery to migrants, refugees and humanitarian entrants to work collaboratively to address the aim and objectives of the SSP.

The consortium comprises 23 organisations, including SSI and its 11 member Migrant Resource Centres and multicultural services, as well as 11 community organisations located around the state.

Using the partners’ grassroots experience in their local communities, the NSP’s high-quality, integrated services support self-reliance, equitable participation in Australian society and, as a consequence, promote social cohesion and productive diversity within the Australian community.

See NSP Highlights 2015-16.

Settlement Services Programme overview

The Settlement Services Programme (SSP) provides for the delivery of core settlement support for humanitarian entrants and other eligible migrants in their first five years of life in Australia.

Its objective is to provide support for eligible clients to promote economic and personal wellbeing, independence and community connectedness. These services can also facilitate pathways to learning English, education and employment readiness and help refugee and humanitarian entrants become fully-functioning members of society.

Eligible clients

SSP services can be provided to permanent residents who have arrived in Australia in the last five years as:

  • humanitarian entrants; and/or
  • family stream migrants with low levels of English proficiency; and/or
  • dependants of skilled migrants in rural and regional areas with low English proficiency.

Services may also be provided to:

  • selected temporary residents in rural and regional areas who have arrived in the last five years and have low English proficiency; and
  • newly arrived communities which require assistance to develop their capacity to organise, plan and advocate for services to meet their own needs and which are still receiving a significant number of new arrivals.

Service types

Services undertaken in delivering the SSP include:

Casework/coordination and settlement service delivery — Provision of settlement related information, advice, advocacy or referral services to individuals or their families due to issues arising from their settlement experience. This service type can include life skills classes and information on rights and responsibilities, including partnerships and programmes that assist clients to become ‘job ready’.

  • Community coordination and development — Provision of assistance to newly arrived clients to make social connections. This service type can include leadership and mentoring activities, linking with mainstream services and working in partnership with local communities to provide a welcoming environment for new arrivals.
  • Youth settlement services — Provision of specialised, customised settlement services targeting young people between the ages of 15 and 24 years. This can include building capabilities in employment education and leadership, homework support and fostering connections with the community
  • Support for ethno-specific communities — Provision of settlement services targeted to new migrants and refugees from communities that may lack ‘critical mass’ to develop information networks and participate in the local community. This service type includes identifying newly arrived migrants through ethno-specific networks and referral to existing support groups and services.

 

DSS

 

The NSW Settlement Partnership is supported by
the Department of Social Services under the
Families and Communities Programme (Settlement
                                                                   Services)

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